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Thread: CPR Training for gerbils

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    Default CPR Training for gerbils

    ASHLAND, Ore. -- Some Oregon firefighters and paramedics are now equipped and trained to give first aid to dogs, cats and other pets.
    The Daily Tidings reports that Ashland Fire & Rescue firefighters were trained last week to do CPR on dogs, cats, ferrets, gerbils and even reptiles that have inhaled smoke. All five department engines now carry oxygen masks for pets.
    Division Chief Greg Case says rescuing pets involved in fires helps the entire family. Firefighters treat people first and will help pets if possible.
    Veterinarian Dr. Alice Sievers says smaller animals can be placed inside the masks, while the devices can be fitted over the nose or beak of larger animals.
    The department received equipment through a donation from Project Breathe.


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    petruccio (24th March 2011)

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    Default Re: CPR Training for gerbils



    OK.....first it is almost physically impossible to NOT click on this thread to see what the hell it's about once you have read the title =)) =)) =))

    ...and second....I have actually given dogs and cats oxygen and emergency care after rescuing them from a house fire, though never to the point of CPR....and it is a very nice feeling to be able to return the much beloved pet back to the family in a slightly-worn but otherwise healthy condition :thumbsup

    The only time I've ever done CPR on an animal was during my initial paramedic training/education :what:...we did a course of study that involved a live animal lab at a Vet School...as part of the graduation exercise for that particular course, the vets would put the animal in question into cardiac arrest through various medical and traumatic methods an we would have to successfully diagnosis, correct, and resuscitate in order to pass :ohman: That was one of the toughest parts of my paramedic training ....and one of the most educational too! :P

    I just post what looks interesting as I'm wandering around the 'net. Credit always to the original scanner(s), capper(s), and or poster(s) of the content that I might put up here

  4. The Following User Says Thank You to petruccio For This Useful Post:

    ken (24th March 2011)

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